All posts filed under: Ruby Bisson

Driving to Scandinavia

by Ruby Bisson The vast, desolate  Scandinavian landscape, barren and cold, blurred into a sea of blues and greens beside us. We were driving 200km/h and belting out Beyonce’s ‘XO’ as loud as we could. Two Australians, two Swiss and a Catalonian. The five of us took the week off, driving across three countries in a hired BMW to escape from the unforeseen workload that comes with studying and to revel in each other’s cultures and interests. On our laps were piles of cheap groceries that later left us paralysed with cramps and pains. In the boot were bedding and clothes and anything we could find from our pantries. We drove to a little wooden cabin in the Danish forests, where pebbles lined the beaches and jellyfish were embedded in the sand, leaves were the colour of sunkissed cheeks and the backyard shed was lined with firewood. We baked three loaves of bread, brownies, gingerbreads and cooked countless flavoursome dinners. We painted our nails Jungle Red and watched rom coms in the comfort of our little house. …

Why I talk to Strangers

by Ruby Bisson Hebrews 13:2- ‘Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing, some people have entertained angels without knowing it.’ Talking to strangers has always been something I’ve been comfortable with. I thrive in a room where no one knows my name or anything about that time I was caught with the guy down the road (or with one too many drinks in my system). I enjoy the power it gives me, the power to recreate myself every time. I love knowing that there are hundreds of stories to devour right there, right in front of me. I get excited, nervous almost, to grab a hold of as many as I can, treating them as these special little nuggets of humanity. When I recently went on a backpacking adventure alone, I knew it was up to me to ensure that I had company along the way and to maintain to courage to do so. This meant finding strangers to make friends with, developing a level of comfort that extended beyond the ‘we should catch up …

New Years Resolutions, from the wise and famous

by Ruby Bisson There’s no lying that co-founder Amy Galea and I have a huge crush on prolific author Neil Gaiman. What better way to enter a new year, (with an upcoming new blog name and a new design) than with bite sized New Years wisdom morsels from the man himself, as written on his blog and collated here. 15 years ago Gaiman wrote: May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you’re wonderful, and don’t forget to make some art – write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself. 9 years ago: …I hope you will have a wonderful year, that you’ll dream dangerously and outrageously, that you’ll make something that didn’t exist before you made it, that you will be loved and that you will be liked, and that you will have people to love and to like in return. And, most …

Happy Holidays- see you in the new year!

We interrupt this blogging schedule to let you know that we’re going on holidays for two weeks! We’ve had an absolute ball tackling this collaborative blogging business with all of you- and we don’t even know who a lot of you are! But we are glad you keep coming back to us. We’ve received such lovely comments and emails and suggestions- and we really appreciate it. And most excitingly- we’ve collected new contributors from around the globe. So we’re going to go away, some of us to the beach, to bask in the glorious sun, others will be chillin’ in their thermals, by the fire. We will be back on the 12th January, with a slightly altered name, a new look, new series and new contributors. We wish you a merry, happy, delicious Christmas! Much love from the editors, Amy and  Ruby x Image via mydarknessfalls

How I came to be a professional scrapbooker

by Ruby Bisson I’m often greeted with a lingering eyebrow raise when I reveal that the person I stay with a couple of times a year is actually a 40-something year old with a house and kids of her own and that, more importantly, I met online when I was 13. I get similar strange, distant looks when I say I am a “professional” scrapbooker. Immediately people assume I adhere to the ‘clean desk, straight lines, mum- material’ stereotype. I entered the small scrapbooking pocket of the internet in an unlikely way. In year seven I started making jewellery, selling my necklaces and earrings from a little pink box in the school yard. I would walk from group to group and open up my case of ziplock bags and let the seniors flick through what I had to offer. If they were cool, I’d offer them well below cost price (50c a pair!). If they brought lunch money to school every day I’d increase the price- having money at school wasn’t exciting for them so …

To Sit Still and Read

by Ruby Bisson I spent a lot of my childhood long past my bedtime curled up in a soft bed, hidden under warm dolphin-print covers, a small torch in my mouth to help me see my book. Most likely it was Roald Dahl’s Matilda (which I read at least 14 times) or the adventures of Julian, Dick, Anne, George and little Timmy in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series. Dad would come creeping down the hall and I would be so engrossed in my book that I wouldn’t hear him approaching. He’d peak into my room and linger there for a while waiting for me to feel his presence at the end of my bed. I’d fold my page and click off my torch, sometimes he’d take the book from me so I couldn’t sneak a second read. It was a struggle for my parents to tear me away from the characters I had fallen in love with. But this was before the age of wifi and mobile phones.