All posts filed under: Book Club

Book Club: Tiny Beautiful Things, advice on love and life from Dear Sugar

by Erin Rose Let me start by saying this book is actually called, Tiny Beautiful Things, advice on love and life from Dear Sugar. But I didn’t even realize it until I went to write this, because I have always simply called it Dear Sugar, and I am going to continue to do exactly that here. So, I found Dear Sugar, or I suppose it’s more apt to say Dear Sugar found me, last spring in a bookstore in the small town I live in right now. A friend who, knowing I love Cheryl Strayed, thrust it upon me and insisted that it would truly be one of the best reads of my life. She and her mother had read it, both carrying it around with them in their purses for weeks. She said it was the kind of book you’ll be pulling out to loan to people or rereading yourself in the years to come. I love anyone who is passionate about reading, and I could tell she meant every word. Have I mentioned yet …

Book Club: Brain on Fire, Susannah Cahalan

by Erin Rose When I first laid eyes on Brain on Fire I was wandering around an airport, I cannot recall which one now, as it seems the last year of my life has been nothing but in and out of airports. Anyway, I was perusing the bookstore, as I always do, and fantasizing about two things: 1. Seeing my own book on the shelf one day and 2. Having enough time in my life to read all the books that I wanted to. Then I saw Brain on Fire and my own self-indulgent daydream came to a ferocious stop. I have to admit that as a product of my generation I am insanely biased by good marketing and packaging. This book stood out because of its colouring, half black- grey and half yellow and its fresh typeface. But most of all I was taken by the woman on the cover staring back at me with somewhat vacant yet frenzied eyes. I knew without opening a page that I had to find out what was happening beyond …

Book Club: The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion

by Erin Rose Joan Didion is a master of words. Her work, her career, her ease with language is something that both inspires and frightens me. She has written in nearly every genre under the sun but I am particularly in love with her nonfiction work. I devoured the essay collection, Slouching Toward Bethlehem, and then began reading nearly everything she’d ever crafted. During this past summer I encountered a particular amount of loss. My mother says people always die in threes. It’s the laws of the universe. I found myself without the proper language to discuss the grief. I am hardly ever without the proper language for anything. It is the one way I know I can communicate with the world and myself. My words are my life. One afternoon I found on the bookshelf in my sisters’ home a copy of, The Year of Magical Thinking. It was as if someone had planted it there for me. I found what I didn’t even know I was looking for.

Book Club: Of Mice and Men, It’s Dinnertime

by Gráinne Regan I’m a reader. Always have been, always will be. I have my preferences in terms of reading material, however I try not to pigeon hole myself. Broadly speaking, my bookshelf is made up of two types of books: the easy readers and the classics, with the occasional tome falling into both self appointed categories (I’m looking at you, The Kite Runner). I look at the easy readers as the light and tasty snacks in between meals. They are generally modern books, written in a readily digestible manner which I gorge upon greedily but which ultimately leave few memories. Then you have the classics, the hearty meals that leave a marked impression- three course dinner style. These are generally the books that make it onto the lifetime reads lists, the stories which have been read and shared by multiple generations. They are often overflowing with beautiful language, language I like to take my time over, to truly appreciate. These stories are filled with honest and thought provoking sentiments which remain long after the last page has been turned. …