Month: March 2015

Driving to Scandinavia

by Ruby Bisson The vast, desolate  Scandinavian landscape, barren and cold, blurred into a sea of blues and greens beside us. We were driving 200km/h and belting out Beyonce’s ‘XO’ as loud as we could. Two Australians, two Swiss and a Catalonian. The five of us took the week off, driving across three countries in a hired BMW to escape from the unforeseen workload that comes with studying and to revel in each other’s cultures and interests. On our laps were piles of cheap groceries that later left us paralysed with cramps and pains. In the boot were bedding and clothes and anything we could find from our pantries. We drove to a little wooden cabin in the Danish forests, where pebbles lined the beaches and jellyfish were embedded in the sand, leaves were the colour of sunkissed cheeks and the backyard shed was lined with firewood. We baked three loaves of bread, brownies, gingerbreads and cooked countless flavoursome dinners. We painted our nails Jungle Red and watched rom coms in the comfort of our little house. …

Sydney Dance Company // Frame of Mind

by Elisa Parry Attending any Sydney Dance Company performance is always a humbling experience, and the opening night of Frame of Mind was no exception. The evening began with the Australian premiere of William Forsythe’s Quintett, followed by the world premiere of Rafael Bonachela’s Frame of Mind. Although Quintett has no narrative, it tells a powerful story. As its name would suggest, five dancers perform the piece, though at times it seems there must be more people on stage. Limbs flail and rage against the confines of the human frame, as if each dancer is trying to escape from each other and themselves. There is an animalistic element to William Forsythe’s choreography, interwoven with glimpses of playfulness and tenderness. Forsythe created the piece as a “love letter” to his wife who was dying of cancer. Through this lens the frustration and futility find resonance, as the dancers twist and contort, pushing the body beyond its limits. Quintett is an incredibly emotive and moving piece that leaves you almost winded from just watching. There is barely …

Two hours in Venice

by Celeste Noche I was travelling from Ljubljana and the Slovenian carpool I’d taken dropped me off in Venice so I could catch my train to Florence. I’d been to Venice once before: it was March of 2010, I hadn’t fully transitioned to shooting in manual (see here and here), and I caught a cold. This time was different. It was late summer, it was still fairly busy with people, and I had two hours. I had big plans to find an old bookshop but, of course, got lost. I think it worked out better this way. I caught glances of quiet squares and deserted canals. It was past noon and although the sun hadn’t quite hit golden hour, it allowed me to see the city in a warmth I had missed that March years ago. And even though I ended up in a panic, not sure if I’d make it back in time for my train, it was well worth it, because seeing Venice always is.   All photos by Celeste Noche. A version of this post first appeared here. …

The warmest colours of Malta

On an adventure through my hard drive recently, I stumbled across these photos from a trip I took after I finished my undergraduate degree in 2013. At the beginning of the holiday, I spent a few weeks in Malta with family, and as luck would have it a few uni friends were over there at the same time- visiting their respective families (who knew that so many people had Maltese relatives?) (you probably did) (we are everywhere). Suffice to say it was an amazing experience- I ate and drank way too much (pastizzi and Kinnie forever and ever). Fortunately, we spent so much time swimming and walking and dancing, so the damage wasn’t as bad as it could have been. If you don’t know much about Maltese people, they are just about the most hospitable, kind and chatty souls you will come across (to generalise… but what a happy generalisation). My family (particularly my aunties, my cousin Lara and her friends) completely spoilt us- taking us to wine festivals, beaches, restaurants, parties and museums. If you …